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Sketchlar

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Posts: 48
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi Guys,

Im working on an Internal bedroom render but struggling with the realism on this one. Im on a tight deadline so i am trying to keep it simple, however i am unsure of the settings i should be using. 

Can anyone provide any tips on how i can improve the realism of this render in regards to materials and lighting etc. Most items in the room need to stay as they are.  I understand its not good practice to have the light on within a daytime scene, but for some reason i cant get the render to be 'bright' .

the image just looks rather flat and boring, it needs to be bright and striking. any ideas? I can provide the SKP file if anyone wants a play. would greatly appreciate it!

Here is the render so far - it has been brightened in PP, but still looks dull in my opinion. I just want to take it to the next level.

Cheers guys!

Snapseed.jpg 

bigstick

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Reply with quote  #2 
You are expecting a scene like this to be bright, when in reality it wouldn't be. It looks flat because the lighting is washed out.

Looks like you have used too much fill lighting. There is more light from behind the camera than from the sun opposite it.



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jlo

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Posts: 190
Reply with quote  #3 

Here are some things off the top of my head along with allowing more contrast (and lowering the flash fill) as big said: 

- Change the angle of the sun to show more in the room. you have 2 natural light sources in that room -use them. maybe make the rays flow across the foot seat and the skylight would put light on the dresser so maybe midday type of light. This is where podium really shines imo of having natural light look great in interiors. 

- add a lem/s outside of the window if you want more light to go along with the sun. 

- add some small refined grain/paint textures for the painted areas of the wall and ceiling. I always find even a very mild texture always seems to come off better than just a straight sketchup color. 

- make the walls slightly blurred reflective and give them some bump. 
- make some things slightly more off kilter (or less perfect) to be more like a real person lived there or set it up like a real person would do like angling the mirror on the left or angling down the pictures on the wall as if it was naturally hanging etc. 

- lift the dresser and mirror a few millimers and render on high to get a contact shadow where the ground hits the object (or add in pp). 
- I would assume the sun would be the strongest light source and the lamp less so in comparison but it doesn't come off this way. 
- the reflection from the curtain back onto the window seems unnatural or too strong. 
- maybe add more details like keys on the dresser or a phone charger or clock on the nightstand etc. Why not family pics on the dresser instead of ambiguous ones. Where is the cord and plug for the light lamp? Where are the outlets and vents on the walls (or maybe in the floor since they may be a converted attic)? put an outlet just behind that mirror on the left to fill that area and one near the lamp or maybe to the right of the chair. 
- is it strange to have a rug on a carpet? also maybe the rug is too thick/tall (for my tastes at least)
- are  those curtains a fire hazard with that heater right there? 
- also and a dangerous one if you are short on time but change the color of the lamp light to a warmer color. This will affect the entire room color though so it may take time to calibrate color. Here are 3 different (very) warm colors that I like (I believe I went with 2500k last time I tried this): 
3000k= (rgb) 255,177,110
2000k=255,137,14
2500k=255,159,70
this will have the sunlight be very white and the lamp be more orange yellow. It may not work with the green walls but it's worth a try. 


overall, I think it's a decent render though but I'm not the best myself...

Sketchlar

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Posts: 48
Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigstick
You are expecting a scene like this to be bright, when in reality it wouldn't be. It looks flat because the lighting is washed out.

Looks like you have used too much fill lighting. There is more light from behind the camera than from the sun opposite it.




Thank you for your feedback Bigstick. you have pointed out the problems, can you now suggest the solution? 😉 shall i remove the LEM behind the camera and increase the LEM outside? What kind of power should they be? 
Sketchlar

Registered:
Posts: 48
Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlo

Here are some things off the top of my head along with allowing more contrast (and lowering the flash fill) as big said: 

- Change the angle of the sun to show more in the room. you have 2 natural light sources in that room -use them. maybe make the rays flow across the foot seat and the skylight would put light on the dresser so maybe midday type of light. This is where podium really shines imo of having natural light look great in interiors. 

- add a lem/s outside of the window if you want more light to go along with the sun. 

- add some small refined grain/paint textures for the painted areas of the wall and ceiling. I always find even a very mild texture always seems to come off better than just a straight sketchup color. 

- make the walls slightly blurred reflective and give them some bump. 
- make some things slightly more off kilter (or less perfect) to be more like a real person lived there or set it up like a real person would do like angling the mirror on the left or angling down the pictures on the wall as if it was naturally hanging etc. 

- lift the dresser and mirror a few millimers and render on high to get a contact shadow where the ground hits the object (or add in pp). 
- I would assume the sun would be the strongest light source and the lamp less so in comparison but it doesn't come off this way. 
- the reflection from the curtain back onto the window seems unnatural or too strong. 
- maybe add more details like keys on the dresser or a phone charger or clock on the nightstand etc. Why not family pics on the dresser instead of ambiguous ones. Where is the cord and plug for the light lamp? Where are the outlets and vents on the walls (or maybe in the floor since they may be a converted attic)? put an outlet just behind that mirror on the left to fill that area and one near the lamp or maybe to the right of the chair. 
- is it strange to have a rug on a carpet? also maybe the rug is too thick/tall (for my tastes at least)
- are  those curtains a fire hazard with that heater right there? 
- also and a dangerous one if you are short on time but change the color of the lamp light to a warmer color. This will affect the entire room color though so it may take time to calibrate color. Here are 3 different (very) warm colors that I like (I believe I went with 2500k last time I tried this): 
3000k= (rgb) 255,177,110
2000k=255,137,14
2500k=255,159,70
this will have the sunlight be very white and the lamp be more orange yellow. It may not work with the green walls but it's worth a try. 


overall, I think it's a decent render though but I'm not the best myself...



Thank you for the comprehensive feedback Jlo. Im going to tun off the internal light all together. I want this to be a daytime render not an evening one, and i feel the lamp distracts from the rest of the render. in regards to contact shadows, i have put an offset of 2mm on all items in the render, maybe i will increase this is 4mm on the chair and table and mirror. 

i am replacing the curtains as i hate them.. haha the style doesn't work. 

The rug is a client request, and i haven't used any obvious outlets as the location of the 'as builts' will change. 

my biggest issue is with the lighting, not so much the items within the scene. But i take it all on aboard and will tinker with it today. 

Cheers!
bigstick

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sketchlar
shall i remove the LEM behind the camera and increase the LEM outside? What kind of power should they be?


Precisely!

Actually, you might want to reduce the power of the LEM behind the camera instead of deleting it. It’s supposed to simulate either bounced indirect light from the surfaces behind or a diffused camera flash.

There’s no way to determine the light power settings without seeing what they currently are, and in any case it’s simply a matter of trial and error.

You also ought to use the HDR presets and render to an HDR format, and post-process. There is information on this in the TT&T thread here http://supodiumforum.websitetoolbox.com/post/hdr-presets-8429390?pid=1294959423 .

Rendering simulates what a camera sees, not what people see. Our brains interpret what our eyes see, which is why PP is so important.

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That which does not kill us makes us stronger
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