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anahkalaf

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello,

I've searched for a bit, but I couldn't find any posts with this topic. If there's already one, please let me know!


So I have quite a lot of difficulty adjusting lightning in a render with no natural lights (a piece without any windows for example).
I think the problem may be that general lighting is usually provided by the sun, and adding ominis only for general lightning makes the render quite slow.

Do you have any tips/tricks about adjusting lighting for interior renders without any natural lightning?

Thank you very much!
bigstick

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Reply with quote  #2 
Imagine how you would light this space in reality, and apply the same principle. 

With no windows, you are relying on artificial light, or indirect light from an opening to another space which is illuminated.

If you are relying on artificial light, add light fittings.

If you are relying on bounced indirect light, say through a doorway, use a large low power LEM, configured to be 100% transparent and invisible. 

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Timaphillips

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by anahkalaf
Hello,

I've searched for a bit, but I couldn't find any posts with this topic. If there's already one, please let me know!


So I have quite a lot of difficulty adjusting lightning in a render with no natural lights (a piece without any windows for example).
I think the problem may be that general lighting is usually provided by the sun, and adding ominis only for general lightning makes the render quite slow.

Do you have any tips/tricks about adjusting lighting for interior renders without any natural lightning?

Thank you very much!


I model large grocery stores and smaller convenience stores. Lighting can be very difficult to accurately convey. I match our lighting design per what we show in the real lighting design. I actually find Podium a quite useful as a tool to sort out any light fixture location issues, changes, etc. So much so that we often change lighting design after I begin modeling/rendering.

That being said, it's not totally precise. I could spend days on end trying to mimic real world conditions but at the end of the day everyone needs to know it's a concept. There is SO much secondary light sources nobody really thinks of. Lights in a refrigerated case or spill light from doors in the frozen food aisle just to name a few. It's not a good investment in drafting/modeling time to do these little details but there's a fine balance between details and NOT that is make or break in terms of output quality. And as you mentioned, render time goes up but that's just the reality of rending. 

This is where ProWalker GPU has been HUGE for my workflow. I can get an idea of lighting in a matter of seconds and can increase overall brightness/gamma without having to go back and touch the Podium light settings. The next biggest thing that's made a dramatic improvement to render outputs is using Adobe Lightroom to edit the rendered images. There's no comparison to the built-in PIE editor. 

To be honest, there's no quick and dirty tricks to get good lighting. It takes time and thoughtful design to get it to render nicely. I don't use hidden LEM - one reason being that ProWalker GPU doesn't use hidden LEM's. Another is that I don't find it very natural.

You will get back what you put in, for sure. 



davew

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Reply with quote  #4 
In SU Podium LEMs are the fastest source of artificial lights.  Putting an LEM face (make sure the material is just a color) behind the SketchUp camera is a good way to apply LEM.  But because LEM's emit light very evenly, it sometimes does not look natural.

Also there's a nice tutorial about LEM fill lights here
http://www.suplugins.com/podium/tutorials/lem-fill.php  In this tutorial hidden LEM are used.

Davor wrote this tutorial but I have tried this technique in several models successfully.

Tim is right that currently ProWalker GPU does not support hidden LEMs.  Like Tim, I use ProWalker GPU initially to visualize where all the light sources are.  This is not fair to Mac users since there is no ProWalker for the Mac.  But ProWalker is very fast (assuming you have a decent Nvidia GPU) so it's a great way to see how the light fixtures will work.

One other thing to consider if you don't want to use LEM and just light fixtures from Podium Browser or point lights, is if the rendered image is not going to be a panorama, remove the wall behind the camera and allow sun light into the interior.

Take a look at some of the lighting tutorials on
http://www.suplugins.com/podium/tutorials.php

as well as in the free user guide.  There are some tips in the user guide as well.
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