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Gaby

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Reply with quote  #1 
First time rendering, please add some comments, I need feedback!

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Gaby

bigstick

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Reply with quote  #2 
Not a bad start, but over-lit.

First of all, when posting images for comments, it's always better to use a standard (not preview) preset. Preview presets mean that we end up with a crappy jagged image to comment on. 
Whenever I see one of these I always think, "Come on, make a bit of an effort!"

You've done what so many people do, and inserted light fittings and not turned them off for interior renders with bright sunlight streaming in, and want feedback to make your image more realistic. The simplest thing to say in all these cases is simply 'turn the lights off' [smile] This will make the lighting balance in your scenes look so much more natural.

The other golden rule is to always use extruded geometry to model your scene. Never use simple flat planes. You see those lines of speckles at the junction of the ceiling and the walls - they are because you have used single planes to model.

Download our Podium Extras plugin from here. Use it to 'float' everything that sits on any other thing, that isn't sealed to it. By this I mean skirting/base boards, furniture, anything on a table or worktop or floor.
You can also use it to randomise location and rotation of components or groups so things don't look as if they are aligned with millimetre precision!

Finally, the furniture in the Browser is a compromise between quality and speed. It looks good from a distance, but from closeup some lack enough detail to be convincingly realistic. Some of it is fine, but most stuff with cushions can look a little stiff.

The solution is to either change the camera view, rotate the furniture, or get more detailed models. Designconnected make some fabulous models. There are lots of free samples, but most of it you have to pay for.



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dldieterich2

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Reply with quote  #3 
I think, Bigstick, that you and I are going to eternally disagree on turning interior lights off for interior renderings.  My perspective is coming from that of an Interior Designer and Interior Design Instructor. 

I would challenge you (and anyone else who's reading this in the daylight) to look around the space they're in, and also look at lighting in restaurants, retail spaces, and other public places during the day.  Unless you're a pioneer, there are interior lights on. 

Interior designers use interior lighting for a variety of purposed:  task lighting, to delineate space in lieu of walls or other physical boundaries, to highlight art or other objects, and to create mood.  Sometimes a beautiful light fixture just needs to be illuminated because that's how it's best showcased.   While I agree that turning off all the lights and just letting sunlight create the illumination is the fastest and easiest thing to do; I don't agree that it necessarily creates the most realistic lighting.  And for interior designers, it definitely doesn't communicate to the client what the final space will look like, which is our usual goal.  We need to be able to show the client how lighting will be used in the space and how that will effect the user.

Anyway, I realize we're coming from 2 very different perspective, but for my industry, I think interior lights must be left on.

Cheers!
bigstick

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Reply with quote  #4 
I understand the point you are making, but I think that the presumption that you can always keep lights in interiors on is flawed. Yes, sometimes you do need artificial lights on during the day. With commercial interiors, you're right, often the lights are indeed on. Most of the images we tend to get here are domestic renders, and with smaller spaces and shallower rooms, you don't need this nearly as much.

This is a point that I debate regularly with Paul Olson. He's on your team [smile]

The next point is that whether a scene is over-lit, is not necessarily linked purely to turning artificial lights on. It's the number of lights, their strength and their proximity to one another that determines this as much as anything.

I'm a chartered architect who runs a multi-million £ design office in the UK (I do Podium stuff in my spare time) so I agree with your points regarding about composing scenes and setting a focal point and creating an atmosphere in images. As all the work I do is either commercial or education, I probably need interior lighting more than most. I accept that even when you don't need artificial lights, sometimes they provide a focal point. 

We don't actually disagree here. The issue here surely is being selective and using judgement. [smile]

This scene has all the lights on! I could understand why the under-cabinet lights might be left on, but the globe lights and the feature pendant in the middle of the room as well, when there is so much natural light?

In reality, you wouldn't see as strong shadows from those lights if the sun was that strong.

Also - you can create a mood with a darker scene with more natural-looking image.

So, although there is room for subjectivity in terms of lights on vs. lights off, I think it's also fair to say that this render is over-lit [tongue]

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Builder2010

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Reply with quote  #5 
This is why I read every issue of the Podium Forum; I get insights from people with vastly more experience than I have. As a hobbyist SU/Pod user there's no way that I could formally learn what the members of this community have to share, but I can absorb some of it vicariously by paying attention to what's being discussed here. Well done!
pmolson

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dldieterich2
I think, Bigstick, that you and I are going to eternally disagree on turning interior lights off for interior renderings.  My perspective is coming from that of an Interior Designer and Interior Design Instructor. 

I would challenge you (and anyone else who's reading this in the daylight) to look around the space they're in, and also look at lighting in restaurants, retail spaces, and other public places during the day.  Unless you're a pioneer, there are interior lights on. 

Interior designers use interior lighting for a variety of purposed:  task lighting, to delineate space in lieu of walls or other physical boundaries, to highlight art or other objects, and to create mood.  Sometimes a beautiful light fixture just needs to be illuminated because that's how it's best showcased.   While I agree that turning off all the lights and just letting sunlight create the illumination is the fastest and easiest thing to do; I don't agree that it necessarily creates the most realistic lighting.  And for interior designers, it definitely doesn't communicate to the client what the final space will look like, which is our usual goal.  We need to be able to show the client how lighting will be used in the space and how that will effect the user.

Anyway, I realize we're coming from 2 very different perspective, but for my industry, I think interior lights must be left on.

Cheers!


Hold the presses! Wait...wait....do you hear it?  Yes!... it is angles singing!!!

Got a little exited there when i read your very well stated argument for "lights on".

nicely put.

Paul



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