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chx_1138

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Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #1 

Howdy Podium folks!

I've been studying LEM lighting as part of an overall effort to learn Podium lighting. In the attached image, I'm showing 4 LEMs, two are down-lights and two are configured for overall soft wall illumination. All four have cast shadow selected, but in particular, the down (horizontal) lights (at the tower) are not casting shadows.

I've also attached a screen shot of the Podium Material Properties palette settings for one of the horizontal LEMs...

Could this be a render style issue? Podium Style or SU Style-related?

Thanks,

Chuck

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Mac OSX 10.13.6 (17G65)
SketchUp Pro 2018, 18.0.16976
SU Podium v2.5x
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 LEM lights with Shadow ON? 2.jpg 
LEM lights with Shadow ON? 3.jpg 
LEM lights with Shadow ON?.jpg 



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[biggrin] Chuck
bigstick

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Posts: 10,704
Reply with quote  #2 
If you want natural lighting, you need to simulate how you would expect to see the lighting in real life.

If you want a studio setup, Justin posted one a little while back. I can't find it, but there's a great tutorial here.

If you want to simulate natural light, start with where the light is coming from. Don't add too many sources because it will screw up your shadows and indirect lighting.

There is generally one key light source, with the rest being bounced around the scene. Your scene has washed out all the shadows on your model, your object looks like it is floating in space. Because of all the light bouncing around the scene, you have actually washed out the shadows.

If you would expect your scene to be illuminated by light fittings, add the fittings, or add small (think of the size of the fitting) LEMs to simulate them. Then you might want to add a large low power LEM behind the camera to simulate a camera flash - only if you need it!

Personally I would take out the wall washing LEMs. They are killing your lighting generally.

This is about scene setup, not lighting not working 😉



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chx_1138

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Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #3 
Thank you Bigstick.

Without your feedback, I'd still be fumbling around in the dark [wink]

Much appreciated!

Chuck

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigstick
If you want natural lighting, you need to simulate how you would expect to see the lighting in real life.

If you want a studio setup, Justin posted one a little while back. I can't find it, but there's a great tutorial here.

If you want to simulate natural light, start with where the light is coming from. Don't add too many sources because it will screw up your shadows and indirect lighting.

There is generally one key light source, with the rest being bounced around the scene. Your scene has washed out all the shadows on your model, your object looks like it is floating in space. Because of all the light bouncing around the scene, you have actually washed out the shadows.

If you would expect your scene to be illuminated by light fittings, add the fittings, or add small (think of the size of the fitting) LEMs to simulate them. Then you might want to add a large low power LEM behind the camera to simulate a camera flash - only if you need it!

Personally I would take out the wall washing LEMs. They are killing your lighting generally.

This is about scene setup, not lighting not working 😉



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[biggrin] Chuck
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