SU Podium Forum
Register  |   |   |  Calendar  |  Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 1 of 2      1   2   Next
arqcova

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 372
Reply with quote  #1 

Hello, just like vette01_er I would like the input from the people, It's always a good thing

The inspiration and goal:

life-house-john-pawson-living-architecture-retreat-residential-brick-wales-uk-gilbert-mccarragher_dezeen_1568_3.jpg 
The final render
LifeHouse_SuPodium.jpg 
I find strange how the inspirational and "real photo" doesn't have outlets on the back wall, so after am extensive research I found this more informal photos from a design blog:

catesthill-john-pawson-life-house-38.jpg 

catesthill-john-pawson-life-house-37.jpg

So yes of course, all the professional photographers use a lot of PP and stage photos, etc.

[redface]



__________________
https://www.behance.net/CuevaRoja
bigstick

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 10,334
Reply with quote  #2 
Okay, here we go [wink]

Texturing and detail are very good, but somehow the lighting lacks impact. There is no drama or subtlety in the shadows or reflections on the floor. This makes the render look a little 'flat'.
It's not just pp, it's also the way the light illuminates the space.

This for me at least means that the image hasn't lived up to its full potential.

You look at the image and think "that's very nice" as opposed to "Wow!"


__________________

That which does not kill us makes us stronger
-Friedrich Nietzsche

arqcova

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 372
Reply with quote  #3 

gotcha, Thanks!

So how do think I can make that drama on the floor, I think more reflection? or extra light? different texture with subtle bumps?


__________________
https://www.behance.net/CuevaRoja
bigstick

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 10,334
Reply with quote  #4 
More reflectivity (!) and an LEM outside the window.

Strong indirect light is tricky to achieve with the limitations we have (consciously decided to impose for the sake of ease of use) on the UI controls. Probably the first thing to try is to increase the intensity and exposure and see where that gets you.

Professional visualisers would use the invisible LEM method.

Actually Gary or Nat might be better off helping you with that - they manage to get that fabulous lighting quality...

__________________

That which does not kill us makes us stronger
-Friedrich Nietzsche

arqcova

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 372
Reply with quote  #5 
Gotcha, the LEM outside was a thing already implemented here, it's "L" shaped wall around the windows, color very light yellow, gonna try some more tests

Thanks again!

__________________
https://www.behance.net/CuevaRoja
arqcova

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 372
Reply with quote  #6 

Hello my first tryout with the pano's!

Original PP


Nick's preset


Cool tool!

Going to try the tours

By any chance is in developing the ability to walk? Like a "full baking"? I don't know the terms or the complexity of the possibility! 


__________________
https://www.behance.net/CuevaRoja
jlo

Registered:
Posts: 106
Reply with quote  #7 
I can't load the first pano (nothing shows up). the 2nd loads but it's a bit darker than the normal pictures. Past the lighting which I think big is spot on (lighting is key to everything and almost always unconsidered), I noticed that the original is much more subtle in it's image and gradations and nuance. Notice how the grey mortar is only slightly darker than the brick or the pictures emphasize the white which is close in color to the grey bricks or the wood only slightly changes color from a light pink/beige to a middle pink. The source seems much more a contest of comparable and similar colors than contrasting colors. The only real colors used are shades of grey with the darkest being behind the sink (and center) and the pink/beige which is darkest in the wood of the chairs. Even the outside really is really just a brown similar to the chairs as the green is toned out. Pink is really just a tint of red and beige is just light brown so the entire thing just 2 colors -grey and that brownish/pink range. Technically, it's almost monochromatic with only 1 actual real color since the gray may just be considered a shade of black/white. This is changed -on purpose- to reduce the colors and make the picture more consistent.  Also the range of light to dark is very subtle with most of the image fairly light. the darkest part which is the 2 black pictures and the black outside wall become minor framing devices to the center and even those seem lightened. the colors have been changed purposely from the real objects as seen in the real photos. -Nothing is by accident- in the source and I bet the power outlet was removed because it offset the balance by pulling the focus to the side. the vents above the cabinets are also removed. 
In your image, you also mix in blues and greens which i I think is deviating negatively from the original and the darkness and sharp contrast pulls my eyes to the sides instead of focusing toward the center. 
cu in round 2 [wink]
arqcova

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 372
Reply with quote  #8 

Yeah is strange the 1st link gives me an error also, this is the correct:

Original PP


__________________
https://www.behance.net/CuevaRoja
jlo

Registered:
Posts: 106
Reply with quote  #9 
This works.
The panos certainly make it more immersive. if only the framerates could be helped but I assume it's just the state of running in a browser.   
arqcova

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 372
Reply with quote  #10 
the back side just for the sake of competition of the personal project

Inspiration

1661.jpg 

Render
LifeHouse_back_pp.jpg


__________________
https://www.behance.net/CuevaRoja
atrodler

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 263
Reply with quote  #11 
The hardest thing to figure out when dissecting the inspirational image is how much of what we’re looking at is as close to what was captured on film. ( and I use the word film loosely ) . Therefore, if edited or at least color adjusted, then how do we effectively set up a scene to render knowing that it will be adjusted to match. I think it would be harder to try and match the image with a direct render since we would be setting everything up artificially, even the lighting, so natural light is almost out of the question. All that said, the result is quiet nice considering the true nature of a project like this.
__________________
"adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience." 
-Ralph Waldo Emerson
bigstick

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 10,334
Reply with quote  #12 
I think this is a fabulous exercise in achieving proper photorealism!

Objectively you can look at the images and form the view that they are very good simulations, yet there are still lots of things that can be done to get closer to the image.

Although the attention to detail is fabulous (look at the holes in the brickwork behind the fire!) there are areas where there isn't quite as much care paid. This is not meant to be a criticism, because it's hard to do until you get used to really appreciating the subtle details that you can see in photographs, and the learning process takes a while! This is the sort of image that is nice to work on over time as a learning exercise.

As always it is the three main aspects of rendering that can be improved, textures, detail and lighting. In addition the field of view is not quite the same.

The biggest issue is lighting. This scene relies on diffuse overcast light, which means that we can't use the Podium sun. So we have to use large LEMs outside the windows. Looking at the original photos there is a noticeable shadow cast on the wall behind the flue. That is the most important thing to simulate. Get that right, and the whole scene should look better.

Next we have thee textures. The brick on the walls needs to be lightened and the contrast reduced. The tonal variation between the brick and the mortar on the original is not very strong. it's pretty much the same as the darkest colours in the brick.

The ceiling looks like some sort of coated/bleached timber. I think this needs less contrast and perhaps some desaturation. The tiles under the fire need to be darker with perhaps more contrast. 

In the model itself, the curtains can be reduced in scale along their width, and duplicated. This will give a much greater volume of fabric that is closer to the original.
Detailed sofas like this are tricky. The Browser items generally aren't quite as detailed as this, but if you take the cushions from either this or this model from Designconnected's freebies section, you should get a lot closer.

There may be something closer on 3dw, but navigating through the crap there is very, very time-consuming!

Once we get the tonal balance of the textures right, and a more accurate simulation of the light, we can see what PP we need to get closer to the photo.

[Edit: 20 minutes of searching later, and I found this on 3dW [smile]]




__________________

That which does not kill us makes us stronger
-Friedrich Nietzsche

arqcova

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 372
Reply with quote  #13 

Thanks for the comments and feedback! I will definitely come back to make the suggestions

 

That sofa is amazing Big! it's the same size as my full model! I will try it!

sofa.jpg 



__________________
https://www.behance.net/CuevaRoja
bigstick

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 10,334
Reply with quote  #14 
That shows why the Browser library content is the way it is. It's easy to overload a scene with stuff that kills your render time, and for people to assume that Podium is slow!

We could probably do with some more high quality furniture though.
When we first started the Browser, it was not a high priority, but a few high quality items should be okay now.



__________________

That which does not kill us makes us stronger
-Friedrich Nietzsche

arqcova

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 372
Reply with quote  #15 
I'm compiling a list of all the design connected freebies to share to the community, I don't know if you guys put them on the browser on the free section with credits to DC would be ok and legal?
__________________
https://www.behance.net/CuevaRoja
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.