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pmolson

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Reply with quote  #1 
Any suggestions on how to avoid this problem?

Often times, but not always when I place an image outside a window that I want to be seen in the interior render the colors of that image get very wonked out.

I am using the interior bright high preset and I adjust the brightness and intensity slider down about half way in the darker direction. 

I have the sun positioned and the time of day set to shine some light into the room. This means the sun is not shining directly on the background image.

I have turned off and on the cast and receive shadows on the lake image and have also exploded it and made it a group so it acts like a material.

I have sampled the image and adjusted it to be darker and blue..er 

I changed the glass to less reflection and almost 100% clear in case that was messing with it.

I am guessing this is a result of the interior preset not playing well with the outdoors, but I have done other renders with the same preset and had the outside image render pretty true to form.

As a work around I have removed the image all together and rendered with no background and then photo shopped it in, but I would rather not do that for some other reasons.

Here is the lake photo Nice blue sky
lake-2-1200.jpg 
here is the same photo rendered (work in progress so get off my back about textures and stuff[smile])
notice the over lit and very turquoise color.
Great-Room-turquoise-proble.jpg 
Any thoughts?


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bigstick

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Reply with quote  #2 
Have you tried the HDR preset with it?

The problem is that we are expecting to get something close to what we see in reality. Our eyes constantly adjust to compensate for over-bright or over-dark areas and 'normalise' our vision.
Most of the interiors we see are not as bright in reality as we perceive them to be, our brains enhance the visual information to 'adjust the brightness'.

In Podium we increase the sun intensity and exposure to increase the amount of light we have in rooms to get close to the level of brightness that we are used to seeing. In reality we should probably use an exterior preset with hidden LEMs internally to boost lighting levels. You tend to turn the lights on because you want that level of perceptual brightness you are used to, but it gives a kind of artificial look. [tongue]

You see similar things with cameras when you photograph interiors without a flash. How many times have we all taken an interior photograph without a flash and found it to be too dark?
If you take 2 photographs in a room, one looking away from a window, the other looking at it, you should find that the lighting level looks different. You either see a normal looking exterior and a dark interior, or a normal interior and an over-exposed exterior.

The HDR preset adjusts the tonemapping so that the resulting HDR format image captures a wider ranger of tonal variation (brightness) for better adjustment in post-processing.

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pmolson

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigstick
Have you tried the HDR preset with it?

The problem is that we are expecting to get something close to what we see in reality. Our eyes constantly adjust to compensate for over-bright or over-dark areas and 'normalise' our vision.
Most of the interiors we see are not as bright in reality as we perceive them to be, our brains enhance the visual information to 'adjust the brightness'.



So, what you are saying is..don't believe your lying eyes?  [wink]

I wonder if my brain does not properly adjust room brightness and that is why I always turn on the lights. well...guess I'll add that to the list of things my brain does not do properly.

I will try the hdr presets.

Interesting idea to use an exterior preset and boost lighting inside. As you said, I always use lights anyway, so it would not be that much of a leap.

Thanks for the thoughts.

p



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Nick00

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Reply with quote  #4 
Some of the background in the browser are a bit more dark because of the same reason. If you lower the exposure of your bacround image it will reduce this effect, that's what I did in the past. Of course if you change the sun position your image setting won't work.

Since you have your interior light on on broad day light [wink] - it seems to me the background is a bit too exposed, even with what Jim explained.

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pmolson

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Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks Nick.

I have used the browser back grounds in the past with some success. 

I ended up just rendering with no background and adding an image (setting sun to better justify having the lights on[smile])

The reason I do not like adding the background images in photo shop is I find that any portion of my model that borders the transparent portion or protrudes in front of the transparent area looks jagged or in the case of plants or trees the dreaded cut out outline is very prevalent.

if you look at the window frame you will see how jagged it looks against the photoshopped background.

If you guys have a suggestion for handling that I would love to hear  it. I actualy like to be able to manipulate the back ground post process.

p
great-room-setting-sun.jpg 


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bigstick

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Reply with quote  #6 
When you do this, do you render with transparent png background, and in Photoshop, do you use >Layer>Matting defringe first?
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pmolson

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Reply with quote  #7 
I do use transparent png. Have not any knowledge of layer/defringe/matte.
I will investigate. Would I be doing that to the background layer or the model layer?

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bigstick

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Reply with quote  #8 
Model Layer
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pmolson

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Reply with quote  #9 
My photoshop is elements so a little different path to defringe, but I found it.

Helped a bit. Not as crisp as if I rendered with background, but definitely better.

great-room-qmc-defringed.jpg 

thanks


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bigstick

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Reply with quote  #10 
Yes - definitely better!

I hate Elements.

I can't/won't use it. For me it's pretend Photoshop. It doesn't have too many of the features I use all the time. I would rather use free Gimp than Elements. It's only when I see how awful Elements is that I start to think that maybe Photoshop isn't quite as expensive as it appears [smile]

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pmolson

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Reply with quote  #11 
I pretty much just adjust levels, brightness, tweak colors and resize...oh and now defringe so elements has always been fine for me.  The devil I know I guess is the main reason i use it. Oh, and I will not pay the crazy price that full photoshop demands in both money and computer resources.

Maybe I will look at gimp. A lot of you-all recommend it.

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