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jklinton1

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Hello everyone,
I am in the process of trying out V2.6 plus and have a question on how everyone reduce poly count on vegetation. I am rendering this project that have a lot of vegetation, especially vines. It really bogs the model down when transitioning to different scenes to render. Any ideas on how to reduce the lag? Here's a test render I completed. I haven't even added half of the planting so I am trying to strategize on this one. Also any suggestions on getting the render to look more realistic is welcomed. I still seems a bit cartoonish to me. I've been playing with the exposures on the different HDR but still get similar results. Your suggestions are greatly appreciated. Thanks The Marshall - test 3.jpg 

bigstick

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Reply with quote  #2 
Poly count is in some respects a SketchUp question, not a Podium question, and without any information relating to the actual components, it's difficult to comment meaningfully.

First of all, you need more realism in the model. Things like street lamps, rainwater pipes, road gullies, chimney pots, joints in kerbs and copings - and that tall palm is not a realistic model at all. That's one of biggest problems. It looks like the trunk is sheathed in lots of little shiny apples.

The modelling on the first house look convincing at first, but on closer scrutiny, it's poor. There's a lot of detail, but it's not done well. Some of the windows aren't properly recessed into the walls for example.

Those vines are not touching the floor, so how could anyone expect them to be realistic? There aren't even any planting beds there. Unless you are going to fill those gaps with something that masks the space, it's not a good strategy.

I know it's WIP but you need to start with a structured approach and have a clear idea what you want to achieve.

For images like this, sometimes the best thing to do is accept that photorealism is going to be too time-consuming, and that the final result is not going to be worth the effort. Unless you are just trying to see how realistic you can get this scene to be, at some point you are going to have to accept a reduction in expectations.

For the vegetation, you need to use more 2D components. The screen updating is a known Sketchup problem with high poly models. Its 3d engine is not great at displaying huge models. You can make life easier by turning shadows off and turning off any line effects. Turn off profiles, extensions and jitter. The fastest way to view your model is a wireframe display. It's basically down to your graphics card. This doesn't benefit Podium, but it makes a big difference with complex models in SketchUp. You need a faster GPU and more video RAM. What I sometimes do is create different scenes in my model which turn certain layers off, turns off the textures, shows and any line effects to make navigating the model faster.

I don't know what you mean by "playing with the exposures on the different HDR". Are you using the new 2.6 beta with IBL lighting? It doesn't look like it because I can't see any reflections of the sky on the windows.Are you rendering to the HDR format? If you are, are you using the HDR presets? 

You also need to consider the direction of the sun more carefully, so that the shadow casting enhances the model. In this scene, the sun is coming from the right, and you can't see any shadow detail on the facades. What are you trying to achieve? Are you trying to emphasise the buildings or the planting? Without the sun falling on the buildings, everything lacks definition.

The camera position has also not been selected carefully. You need to compose your image like a photographer would.

What is supposed to be the focal point? At the moment it's that awful palm, which is really not going to convince anyone. If the focal point is supposed to be the first house, it's not in the centre of the picture or even balanced, because the vertical palm in the centre is in effect splitting the image into 2 halves, and that tree on the right is unbalancing your composition.

Even if the palm was a decent model, the arbitrary cropping of the foliage so you just see a sliver at the bottom is silly.

In summary - lots of things to pay attention to, and lots of potential to improve, good luck 😉



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jklinton1

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thank you very much for the feedback. I definitely have some work to do in terms of detailing. 
davew

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Reply with quote  #4 
I really like the design of the home in the fore front.   it's awesome.  is this British?
I think you could move the camera past the fence and closer to the home with a slight wider FOV.  Keep the vines in the background. If there' something that could reflect the vines, that would work.
You might want to lower the HDR/IBL exposure so we see more of it
The second house, as well it's done, could becomes a background.
Do you need the fence? It's a great fence though.
Well done man.
davew

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Reply with quote  #5 
I moved this post to Gallery Jinklinton1.  I like the tree. questions was how high should the HDRI / IBL light should be. I would lower it.  Also how much of the heavy polygon vines shoud be shown. As little as not interfering the display of the man house.  IMO
bigstick

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Reply with quote  #6 
Dave, that house is most definitely not British 😉


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jklinton1

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Reply with quote  #7 
Thank you Dave. Project is not in the UK by the way. It's in Cali.I'll post an updated rendering after I work through some of the issues. Thank you guys for the feedback
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