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FreeAgent

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Reply with quote  #1 

i think it would be a good idea if people posted requests of what they would like to learn or know how to do, this way people would more inclined to post tutotrials... just a thought

jmqrsq

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Reply with quote  #2 

I am having issues with 'hotspots' form my omnis. I think a omni 'best' location tutorial would be nice. Its like I have no idea how many omnis (due to a reason for the quantity) to put in nor do i know the secret about locating them so as too get ideal lighting and no overexposure issues.


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solo75080

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Reply with quote  #3 

I am not the light guru but have been putting a tut together which deals with light vs reflection and will post it in due course, it covers hot spots and how to avoid them.


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jmqrsq

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Reply with quote  #4 
now see that is what i am waiting for. i am trying to 'sell' podium to my firm but i need to show how great it is. Lighting is 95% of it. =)

btw, i love your avatar, did you create it?

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bigstick

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Reply with quote  #5 

This is on my 'to do' list and has been for some time. It seems though that the more light fittings I create, the more I learn about what is possible. I am not yet at the stage where I know exactly how to set up a light to achieve the best results without a bit of trial and error though.

When I think I have reached this stage, I'll put together a proper tutorial

In the meantime, here is a quick top 10 tips guide:-

1. Omni lights are basically point lights that are created by assigning light strength to a group. The 'origin' of the light is at the very centre of the group. This is where the light is most intense. A point light is one which is non-directional. To make it directional, you have to enclose it within geometry.
2. Omnis render much faster than LEMs. Only use LEMs when you need something like strip lighting around pelmets/recesses/shadowgaps. You can also use them when you need to illuminate an area immediately next to a wall without creating a burned out 'hotspot'.
3. The shape of the omni group makes no difference. You can use simple lines to enlarge an omni groupand it doesn't seem to make any difference at all.
4. The size of the omni group seems to affect the strength of the light. To reduce the strength of an omni light, make its geometry as small as possible. I usually use a tiny square. Currently it doesn't look like there will be any way to reduce omni strength to less than 1. Making the omni geometry as small as possible will take you down as close as possible to the minimum size. This seems to be around 150mm.
5. To produce scalloped effects, place the omni group inside a fitting, making sure it is 4"/100mm back from the rim of the fitting. The more a light source is set back, the clearer and sharper the scalloped effect.
6. Small lights don't work very well at all with omnis. For best results, make sure your fitting is at least 150mm/6" diameter. You can make smaller fittings work, but you will need to use LEMs and omnis.
7. To avoid hotspots, keep your lights at least 200-300mm (8-12") away from neighbouring surfaces and turn your light strength down.
8. For linear lighting effects, you can use an array of low strength omnis. This will only really work with fittings which are more than 300mm/12" away from a surface, because even at their lowest power, an array of omnis at the minimum distance will cause too bright a hotspot.
9. The finishes of a fitting will affect its light distribution ability. For example if you have a fitting which uses a reflective diffuser, then you need to assign reflectivity to that part of the model.
10. Try to look at actual photographs of fittings when you want to duplicate the effect in your model. You often do find hotspots in life, so there is little  point in trying to tweak the lighting to avoid them.

As a general rule of thumb these things are broadly true, but you may find anomalies in some instances.

If you want to get more control of your lights, the easiest thing to do is scale up your model by a factor of 10. You will need to adjust the light strength of all fittings and possibly increase the size of your omni geometry, but you can get more accurate and subtle results with small fittings! This is a bit of a hack, but it works very well if you really want to fiddle around. V2.0 should work rather differently, so if you want to play around with the model scale you should bear this in mind.


Finally, don't expect to be able to accurately mimic lighting effects at the moment. You can't use Podium to plan your interior lighting scheme - yet...





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sd1

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Reply with quote  #6 
great post.

thanks mr bigstick.
jmqrsq

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Reply with quote  #7 

Thanks for the 2 cents. =) I will attach a pic of my current scene for rendering and maybe you can point out what i did wrong maybe?? would you mind doing that?


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nomeradona

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Reply with quote  #8 
as omni fanatic, ( because they render faster) i think bigstick has said it all. just an addition, if you want to go around further in having good powerful omni light like spotlight you can scale down your model down too. i did that trick in my last exterior post.   

im still hoping for podium to support IES data. although its low priority at the moment. who knows bump before was not on the original plans of tbd.

thanks big for those thought. maybe revised the faq.  

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jmqrsq

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Reply with quote  #9 

sorry to sound like a moron, but what exactly is IES data? i assume its a general lighting spec item or something.....


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bigstick

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Reply with quote  #10 
Well, I'm tempted to say "if you search the forum for IES, you'll find the answer", but as this thread deals specifically with lighting, it seems like a reasonable place to put a quick summary of what IES data is.

IES data is information contained in a plain text file which describes the spread of light by a particular fitting. It is physically accurate photometric data, and is specific to each fitting. IES support in a render engine means that you will be able to reproduce an accurate distribution of light, so that with together with the actual model geometry Podium will be able to fairly accurately simulate (and therefore you can design) your lighting installation.

There is more information available if you use the forum search facility however

Nomeradona: Actually bump mapping was always intended to be added. But until a good speed/quality balance is achieved, it would be unwise to include it. Looking at the quality of some of the renders without it, I don't think it is a significant omission for the moment anyway. There are also a number of other features that TBD planned to implement right from the start. The main criterion though is to get a stable, bug-free application which is both functional and easy/intuitive to use. Until this is achieved, it doesn't make sense to add more complexity. There are still a number of bugs and stability issues that are scheduled to be addressed, but it has to be said that some of the instability issues that people are experiencing are down to SU6 not Podium...

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TBD

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Reply with quote  #11 
... and I should add
11. if you use LEMs use rectangles to have faster renders instead of circles or other complicated geometry.
jmqrsq

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Reply with quote  #12 

Ok so heres my pathetic attempt at some lighting. as you can see i tried to make the lights objects with flourescent looking bulb omnis in them. looks like crap, not what i wanted. doing the bottom panels on the lights as LEM's looks much better. Second of all the dark area to the upper left of the scene...i have a 65 intensity omnilight there but it is not showing up for some reason. its an exact copy of all the other omnis i am using to light up the interior. I need pointers



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bigstick

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Reply with quote  #13 
I'm sure if you look around you can pick up some pointers

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Fella77

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Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmqrsq

 I need pointers

Dude..there are so many pointers in this forum ( if you look for them ), I wouldn't walk around barefoot ..a fella could get hurt..

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nomeradona

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Reply with quote  #15 
this Thread has been forgotten, but i think a very useful thread to raise issues on requesting tips and tutorial so i pinned this herewith. Besides, this one has bigsticks top ten advise on lighting issues.

nomeradona

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