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Theresa

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Hello everybody!
I will appreciate all your comments, many thanks!

Small apartment 1.png  Small apartment 2.png  Small apartment 3.png

JF

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Reply with quote  #2 
I really like the aesthetic and the lighting of these images. Maybe I would open the doors a little bit to see how it looks.
JustinSlick

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Reply with quote  #3 
Same! These are very warm and inviting, everything is very well done. Really nice palette!

Just curious, what is the FOV of that side-on view? Did you have to hide the wall or cut holes to get that angle?

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Theresa

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To JF:
Thank you for your feedback. It’s important for me to know what others think about the design as I have spent many hours working on it so it’s hard for me to objectively judge what’s good and what’s not. I’ll be handing in the project soon so I’m more confident about it now. You’re absolutely right about the door, it would definitely be better if it was open. However, I wanted to facilitate the whole process and make the rendering time shorter, so I did not want to make the scene bigger, but it would be better, I admit that. Now I made this scene with the door open and I’m sending another room for you to have a look at.  I’ll also keep working on the light, it seems a bit overexposed to me. Thanks again! 
Small apartment 4.png  Small ap. bedroom 1.png  Small ap. bedroom 2.png 

Theresa

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To Justin:
Thank you!
When working on a scene, I do make holes in walls or I move them by a couple of metres. I simple make space like a photographer who, for example, takes a photo of a room from another room or takes a photo from a balcony to get a better composition. So it’s about tricks like these. But it must look real. I don’t use these tricks to make a room look better or bigger, but to make it look like it does in real life. So using the tricks ends up being a bit paradoxical. However, when taking photos you also use different lenses or angles. Or you might even end up crawling on the floor to get the best shot 😉 Anyway, I never remove walls completely as it seems to me that doing such a thing results in distortion of reflection and light. I use LEM behind the camera almost every time. Nonetheless, working with light is always complicated.
bigstick

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Reply with quote  #6 
These are really nice renders with a lovely warm, airy feel.

You could say that some of the renders are a little over-exposed, but arguably it looks a bit like a bright summer morning somewhere where the sun is very intense.

There's a lot of great attention to detail and care in these images, and no shortage of skill, so well done!

Still some room for improvement in angling pictures on the wall and elevating things to accentuate the contact shadows for more realism.

In terms of the design, not so much good news it's nice, but a bit 'basic'.

By that I mean it's all simple, plain and tasteful. 


You've got a blue and white thing going on the prints and fabrics, but it could be seen as bland and insipid.

Every room has oak flooring, white walls and blonde wood furniture which could be ash or maple.

If anyone wanted to be critical, they could say that it's basic in the sense of 'basic bitch' [rolleyes]

I don't think I would go quite that far, but it wouldn't be too unfair to say there isn't actually a lot of design in evidence.

We have almost the entire range of Farrow & Ball colours in the Browser, but you've stuck to what looks like plain RGB 255,255,255 white. Have a look a the Farrow & Ball site for inspiration about what you can do with subtle colours.





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Theresa

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Reply with quote  #7 
Thank you for your feedback and criticism.
It helps me improve and makes me approach my next project more thoughtfully. 


I would like to respond to some of the comments:

The wood: Yes, I used oak for the flooring and also for the furniture. It would probably be better to make it darker a bit as in combination with the light, it might not look like oak. 

The colours: The chosen colour palette is based on my client’s wishes. The apartment is designed for an elderly lady. Also, the design is influenced by the fact that the flat is small and when occupied, there will be more stuff lying around as is usually the case, so using more colours would result in an overwhelming and irritating feel. The combination of blue, green and orange seemed to be sufficient to me in this case. 

Yes, there is pure white on the walls indeed. I went for pure white as when I used cream (off-white) from Farrow and Ball, the whole render ended up being too yellow and I couldn’t do much about it. I think Photoshop could be of some help here but I’ve only started using the software so… 

I personally really like Farrow and Ball, they have beautiful products and I appreciate them having been included into the Browser. 

Anyway, I prefer design to be more lively and I like colours. However, I have to follow my clients’ wishes and sometimes it means I cannot use as many colours as I would wish. 

Just to be sure: You’re saying the render is ok but the design is the problem? As an interior designer, this might worry me, however, I have to say that the contrary is true. Your feedback has encouraged me as I will be more bold about the wholle project in the future. 

Thanks again!
JF

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Reply with quote  #8 
I was surprised at how much it made a difference for me (opening the door). Love it! It looks more realistic and lived in now.

A little note on the Farrow and Ball white colours. A few weeks ago, I actually experimented with them for a render. I found it usefull to consult the F&B website to help me choose (especially for the whites - most difficult colour to choose [wink]) To see the colours one next to the other was really helpful. For example, for a true withe, I like All White, for a yellowish one, Snow White, for a bluish on, Cabbage White, etc.

I realized that in the case of your renders, I would may be use the layered white technique where you choose different shades of white for different elements: the walls one shade, the ceiling another and the trims and doors another. That might give it some depth and warmth.

Thank you for sharing these.
bigstick

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Reply with quote  #9 
Although I help out with Podium, my full time job is as a Chartered Architect in the UK. I run an architectural office in local government. We produce mainly education, leisure and commercial projects. In the past few years my work has won a number of awards. Design is particularly important to us.

The thing I find about clients, is that most of the time they can't distill their requirements, even sometimes when they seem to have some very fixed views!

You may have heard things like the customer is king and give the customer what they want but what do you do when you are on a fixed fee and they don't know what they want?

My approach is that a good designer will not necessarily give the customer what they say they want, but to analyse their actual requirements and things they really like to give them something they hadn't thought about, didn't realise they wanted, but that they actually prefer far more.

That for me is what design is really about.

To address the specific issue of plain white walls - I think there really is no excuse for this most of the time. When I built the extension to my house and everything was decorated, we just used plain white. The new bit contrasted with the old bit, so all the colours were white and the finishes clean and modern.

Except it was boring. Some 15 years later we got away from plain white with a Farrow and Ball Pavilion Blue on the walls and the doors and timberwork in Strong White.

Pavilion blue isn't really blue at all, it's kind of a pinkish grey (or so my wife tells me, and if I remember correctly, I'm red-green colour blind and pink is a real problem), but it's a nice soft interesting colour, and tones nicely with the architraves and skirting (base) boards, and the ceiling, which is flat plain white. When it's repainted, it may well stay pure white, but might also end up as Strong White. If you go somewhere and actually look at the different shades of white (it doesn't have to be Farrow and Ball, but their colours are beautiful, very flat, and seem to use a lot more pigment than mass market manufacturers) you'll see a massive difference. We couldn't for example have used Cornforth White or Snow White or Shadow White.

F&B paint is nice because although it's expensive it has very little odour, brushes clean up really easily, and it's nice to apply. The depth of colour is really noticeable. I made the mistake once of trying to duplicate the colour with a modern emulsion. It was awful and looked nothing like the original. Their Estate Emulsion is not very durable though, so in bathrooms for example you might want to use estate eggshell instead. It's very flat for eggshell with not much sheen at all, but far more durable than emulsion.

Going back to your design, your client is old, yet you have given her minimalistic furniture. Old people tend to have houses with accumulated clutter representing memories. The things they have mean things to them. As they become less able and mobile, they spend more and more time in their houses and the quality of their environment is really important. The things they touch and feel and look at all the time should have some sort of quality about them. They tend to live a lot in their memories.  Giving them environments that fire their memories and make them feel better is a great thing to do.

What you have shown looks like standard wipe-clean cheap stuff that you would find in a care home. Japanese style minimalism generally doesn't work well for old people. It only works if people really appreciate that sort of thing, the workmanship is beautiful, the materials really high quality, and they keep the rooms clutter-free. Otherwise it can look cheap and generic.

You've also used full width curtain and pelmets on small windows. Nothing says 'old person's interior' or 'hotel room' more than pelmets. They get dusty and are a pain to clean for able-bodied people. In making the curtains bigger and heavier and higher than they need to be, in effect you are increasing the likelihood of them collecting dust, and making them more difficult to manage. There is nothing in any of these rooms with any quality. Not one single beautiful thing to look at and absolutely no personality or character at all.

Look at the Farrow & Ball Inspiration page for example for Bedrooms and the second image in particular. That looks white but is actually (coincidentally) Pavilion Blue and it uses a lot of clean fresh different shades of pale colours. I have an RSS feed to Remodelista which I check regularly. You would probably prefer to follow their Instagram feed instead [wink]

If often has images showing how you can do clean minimalism, but with quality and character. If you look at this image, you can see a small study not hugely different from what you have.

This one however has a contrasting picture frame, a strongly contrasting bed throw, some furniture that looks like it has been made by actual people and a ceiling light that sort of matches the side light. The quality is in the texture and quality of the materials - but I think it's far too ascetic for a bedroom.

So yes, renders very nice, design - not so much...

[Edit: My wife tells me Pavilion Blue is apparently greenish, not pinkish and apparently I'm stupid. It's another colour I can't see...]



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