SU Podium Forum
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
bigstick

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 10,816
Reply with quote  #1 
This is a model I built from scratch a while ago as an exercise in modelling in SketchUp.

I tried using Subdivision modelling at first, but I really couldn't get the hang of it. I may try again later.

I built this model literally face by face, manually triangulating the mesh and dragging the vertices using 2D drawings as references.

The seats were the most difficult elements by far!

I've been adding details from time to time. It took me a long time to find all the textures and reference material.

It's rendered using V2.6 using the new Image based Lighting (IBL) background option using the exterior default HDR preset and PIE.

I have a couple of things to do before it's ready for the Browser, but it's coming soon [wink]

Scene 2.jpg  Scene 1.png 


__________________

That which does not kill us makes us stronger
-Friedrich Nietzsche

ottoman

Registered:
Posts: 48
Reply with quote  #2 
very very good 👏👏 I'm getting better with your advice. Thanks Bigstick
davew

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 1,753
Reply with quote  #3 
Damn, you modeled this in SketchUp?  That must have been building an igloo out of rectangular cubes of ice.
Nice job...actually amazing now that you have revealed you were using SketchUp.  No G2 continuity necessary.
bigstick

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 10,816
Reply with quote  #4 
Yes - it was a modelling challenge that grew and grew!

I built every single line, polygon and texture. finding texture sources is one thing, but undistorting them and tiling is always required.

I'm looking at a long term project of perhaps building a Mark 1 Corvette Roadster next. That should be a whole lot faster, but I do have to juggle it with lots of other stuff.

__________________

That which does not kill us makes us stronger
-Friedrich Nietzsche

atrodler

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 351
Reply with quote  #5 
your projects sound like my projects which turn into life events! 

this is sweet! good choice to model. I have a couple of comments being one who appreciates cars. I haven't built a car from scratch but the ones that I have posted renderings of are those that I found and spent a great deal of time going over and fixing things, adding things, etc. When I render, one result that doesn't lie but rather reveals is what is presented in the reflections. Which then in turn points me to where I need to further refine the model.

If you look at the horizon line across the length of the side of the car, the reflection shouldn't change across any of the body panels. So something changes at the driver side door whether it be the physical location of the door in relation to the car, or whether it be in the coordinated geometry of the body line as flows from the front fender, through the door, to the rear quarter panel. The trunk lid is a great example of nicely aligned panels. the hood appears sunken.

If you look at the reflection of the horizon in the front fender and door, you can clearly make out the physical attributes of the landscape in the reflection but if you look at the rear quarter panel, its goes crazy. I would bet that the changes in the direction of the curb alone is directly associated with the hidden geometry in the car. it looks like a dent of which upon closer inspection, you may discover that there actually is one even if it is very shallow. if you look just behind the driver headlight, the subtle changes in the curb, I can almost see where there is either a point, or the TIN division of a quad surface. In my terrain modeling experience this is where subdividing helps. 

But! it is a cool car. and I love the colors that come out at that time of day. I have been playing around with a 1963 split window corvette. a restomod of one that was recently auctioned at Barrett Jackson. 


__________________
"adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience." 
-Ralph Waldo Emerson
bigstick

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 10,816
Reply with quote  #6 
You're right about the reflections! They really irritate me, but sometimes you just have to stop!

I spent so many hours actually realigning individual vertices to improve the lines, that I got RSI in my wrist 😉

If you look at the alignment of the seams, you can actually start to see natural curves in all directions, which does help to make the shape right. However, I could spend days and days getting these right. Even when the polygon model looks perfect in SU, when you render you can see all the imperfections. That makes it really hard to get things perfect.

From memory, the polygons run in a consistent line across the side of the body shell, so ought to be aligned. At the rear of the car where the reflections go mad, its partly a consequence of the fairly low polygon count. I tried to create a decent model with a fairly low poly count. The geometry looks okay. It's not perfect, but shouldn't produce the effects visible in the render. I suspect it's due to the way the seams transition. I might try a higher smoothing angle...

Screenshot 2019-05-24 at 14.56.44.png 

The body shell was the first thing to be built, and everything from that point on was based on what I learned!

It's a fair point about the bonnet. I must have nudged that by mistake. Fixed now.

I model the actual surface first, and then cut the panels out afterwards, but when the panel cuts are made, the polygon intersections are all in the wrong places and I have to start moving vertices again.

The next one should be better [wink]


__________________

That which does not kill us makes us stronger
-Friedrich Nietzsche

bigstick

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 10,816
Reply with quote  #7 
It's weird - rendering without the IBL background but reflecting other things in the environment don't show up any issues at all in these areas.

If you look at the renders, you can see that the misalignment in the environment reflection between the door and the bodyshell is completely different between the two images.

What I have found however, is that triangulating vertices  all ought to run in the same direction. The characteristic V shape should be avoided because it creates issues.

I suspect that is what might be causing the distortion..

I've tweaked some vertices, I'll test some more...

__________________

That which does not kill us makes us stronger
-Friedrich Nietzsche

atrodler

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 351
Reply with quote  #8 
Don't beat yourself up too much. It's a great model. just remember, not many folks model cars in this manner, they use other more cad based programs and actually calculate the curves and parabolas mathematically to get all points in exact locations in space. then they export to sketchup. 

One thing that would probably help you is to scale back the reflection a bit on the body paint. 

__________________
"adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience." 
-Ralph Waldo Emerson
arqcova

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 539
Reply with quote  #9 

Just have one word: WOW!

 

Nice hobby and meditative work, it reminds me of this guy in the sketchup forums that is making this complex nasa vehicle from scratch piece by piece, truly a work of passion.


__________________
https://www.behance.net/CuevaRoja
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.